posted by Ian Summers on August 8th, 2012

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The generous and always interesting folks at Design Taxi just released an article at their site called Early Advertising Artworks by Doctor Seuss. Did you know that Doctor Theodore Seuss Geisel was an illustrator before he found fame as a children’s book¬†author?

Decades ago, I was the Executive Art Director at Ballantine Books which is an imprint of Random House. On my first day, I rode up in the elevator with Dr. Seuss. What a trip! When I left for lunch, I rode down to the lobby with Gore Vidal. I was too scared to make eye contact. Working for Random House was the best job I ever had.

Design Taxi’s post led me to The Advertising Artwork of Dr. Seuss. Give yourself a treat and see the early work of a man whose work entertained generations of children. So many of his characters and stories have entered the popular culture of people around the globe.

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posted by Ian Summers on June 28th, 2012

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I have long been an advocate of diversity. As an artist I cannot imagine doing one thing for an entire lifetime. Artists have a wide variety of interests and a natural curiosity. The 1980s were the error of specialization. For example commercial photographers were taught that they must choose a specialty and style. They were told they must do the same thing for the rest of their careers. It was not enough to shoot food. One had to specialize in liquids, spills and splashes. Food was not a specialty. Things that are fried — now that was a specialty.

The availability of information, visual stimulation, ideas, and so much more at the click of a mouse gives us the opportunity to vacuum clean the universe for ideas and ways to execute them. A big part of the creative process is to synthesize. The more we have to synthesize the greater the possibilities of creating something new present themselves.

Shea Hembrey’s TED talk entitled How I Became a Hundred Artists demonstrates diversity in a tongue-in-cheek way that is interesting, entertaining, and motivating. And is all good fun.

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How do you stage an international art show with work from 100 different artists? If you’re Shea Hembrey, you invent all of the artists and artwork yourself — from large-scale outdoor installations to tiny paintings drawn with a single-haired brush. Watch this funny, mind-bending talk to see the explosion of creativity and diversity of skills a single artist is capable of.

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posted by Ian Summers on June 13th, 2012

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