posted by Ian Summers on June 28th, 2012

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I have long been an advocate of diversity. As an artist I cannot imagine doing one thing for an entire lifetime. Artists have a wide variety of interests and a natural curiosity. The 1980s were the error of specialization. For example commercial photographers were taught that they must choose a specialty and style. They were told they must do the same thing for the rest of their careers. It was not enough to shoot food. One had to specialize in liquids, spills and splashes. Food was not a specialty. Things that are fried — now that was a specialty.

The availability of information, visual stimulation, ideas, and so much more at the click of a mouse gives us the opportunity to vacuum clean the universe for ideas and ways to execute them. A big part of the creative process is to synthesize. The more we have to synthesize the greater the possibilities of creating something new present themselves.

Shea Hembrey’s TED talk entitled How I Became a Hundred Artists demonstrates diversity in a tongue-in-cheek way that is interesting, entertaining, and motivating. And is all good fun.

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How do you stage an international art show with work from 100 different artists? If you’re Shea Hembrey, you invent all of the artists and artwork yourself — from large-scale outdoor installations to tiny paintings drawn with a single-haired brush. Watch this funny, mind-bending talk to see the explosion of creativity and diversity of skills a single artist is capable of.

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posted by Ian Summers on June 13th, 2012

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posted by Ian Summers on June 6th, 2012

The New York Times

Wednesday, June 6, 2012 — 10:45 AM EDT

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Ray Bradbury, Master of Science Fiction, Dies at 91, A.P. Says

Ray Bradbury, a master of science fiction whose lyrical evocations of the future reflected both the optimism and the anxieties of his own postwar America, died on Tuesday in Southern California. He was 91.

By many estimations Mr. Bradbury was the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream. His name would appear near the top of any list of major science-fiction writers of the 20th century, beside those of Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein and the Polish author Stanislaw Lem.

In Mr. Bradbury’s lifetime more than eight million copies of his books were sold in 36 languages. They included the short-story collections “The Martian Chronicles,” “The Illustrated Man” and “The Golden Apples of the Sun,” and the novels “Fahrenheit 451” and “Something Wicked This Way Comes.”

Read an Interview with Ray Bradbury from a previous post on the Heartstorming blog.

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